<HTML><BODY style="word-wrap: break-word; -khtml-nbsp-mode: space; -khtml-line-break: after-white-space; "><DIV><DIV>On 01/08/2006, at 7:07 PM, Piers Cawley wrote:</DIV><BR class="Apple-interchange-newline"><BLOCKQUOTE type="cite"><DIV style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; ">* Finish working through the implications of the new state machine</DIV><DIV style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; "><SPAN class="Apple-converted-space">  </SPAN>based content 'state'. Essentially, 'published?', 'spam?' and a few</DIV></BLOCKQUOTE><DIV><BR class="khtml-block-placeholder"></DIV><DIV>This looks great, but I would like to see this reflected in the admin interface. Particularly with spam - Wordpress' Akismet plugin does a great job of not only filtering out the spam but holding it in limbo in case of false positives. Typo does this but it's a bit counterintuitive from an administration perspective - they're not marked as presumed spam, merely unpublished. It took me a while to realise that real comments were being published and that spam was being held.</DIV><DIV><BR class="khtml-block-placeholder"></DIV><DIV>Also it seems that you (blog admin) need to go and remove unpublished (ie spam) comments periodically. They seem to appear on the articles otherwise. Or am I doing something wrong?</DIV><DIV><BR class="khtml-block-placeholder"></DIV><BLOCKQUOTE type="cite"><DIV style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; ">* Investigate other blogging engines' plugin architectures. See if</DIV><DIV style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; "><SPAN class="Apple-converted-space">  </SPAN>we're missing any capabilities and what we'd need to do to import</DIV><DIV style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; "><SPAN class="Apple-converted-space">  </SPAN>any useful stuff into Typo.</DIV></BLOCKQUOTE><DIV><BR class="khtml-block-placeholder"></DIV><DIV>As a recent wordpress convert, I have some experience with that blogging engines' plugin architecture. And I have to say that while it does encourage a large ecosystem of plugins, it also required a lot of work in putting the extensibility points into the base. From my experience, many plugins (still) require manual tweaking of themes and/or the wordpress base to make work right.</DIV><DIV><BR class="khtml-block-placeholder"></DIV><DIV><FONT class="Apple-style-span" face="Helvetica">Not all is well with the wordpress plugin architecture, is the lesson to be learned from posts such as this one: <A href="http://www.somethinkodd.com/oddthinking/2005/12/08/wordpress-and-text-encoding/">http://www.somethinkodd.com/oddthinking/2005/12/08/wordpress-and-text-encoding/</A></FONT></DIV><DIV><BR class="khtml-block-placeholder"></DIV><BLOCKQUOTE type="cite"><DIV style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; ">Hmm... that'll probably do for now. Did I miss anything?</DIV></BLOCKQUOTE><DIV><BR class="khtml-block-placeholder"></DIV></DIV><DIV>Some other suggestions:</DIV><DIV><BR class="khtml-block-placeholder"></DIV><DIV> * Ability to configure multi-column sidebars</DIV><DIV> * A wordpress-like "dashboard" of recent comments, incoming links, stats (number of articles, comments, etc)</DIV><DIV> * Ability to specify a license on a per-page or per-article basis (with a blog-wide default obviously) which would generate the right HTML and RDF for easy inclusion in themes. I'm thinking specifically of making it easy to add a creative commons license to a blog.</DIV><BR><DIV>I for one am happy to see lots of action on Typo lately. And I hope to be able to contribute something back. Part of the reason for converting to Typo was to get up to speed on rails.</DIV></BODY></HTML>