[rspec-users] [cucumber] Cucumber and CI

Matt Wynne matt at mattwynne.net
Tue Feb 24 05:26:58 EST 2009


On 24 Feb 2009, at 09:30, Rob Holland wrote:

> On Tue, Feb 24, 2009 at 9:17 AM, Matt Wynne <matt at mattwynne.net>  
> wrote:
>
>> You can even use git commit --amend to commit on red (e.g at the  
>> end of the
>> day) and then change that commit later.
>
> While I think commit --amend is very useful, I'm not sure why you'd
> bother to commit at the end of the day, knowing full well you were
> going to amend it first thing tomorrow morning.
>
> What have you gained by commiting a known-bad change set? It does no
> harm sure, but I don't understand the gain.

Good question. It's not something I do routinely, but when I do, I  
have a couple of motives:

I take my laptop home on the bus through central London, so I like to  
push my local branch up to the server (using the wonderful  
git_remote_branch[1]) just in case some scally-wag takes a shine to it  
and decides they want it more than me.

The maturity of the team I'm on means that we have quite a variety of  
development environments, so I might again use the remote branch as a  
'shelf' to pass the failing code from one machine to another if we  
decided to move to working on someone else's machine.

I also do this when I need to urgently switch out of the story branch  
to work on something else. In that case I drop everything, commit as  
it, and checkout the branch I need to start working on.

It's also worth mentioning Kent Beck's advice in the original TDD book  
where he advocates leaving one test failing when you go home. Not that  
you have to commit it to source control, but it's a nice idea -  
leaving a thread hanging so you know where to start the next day.


[1]http://github.com/webmat/git_remote_branch/tree/master

Matt Wynne
http://blog.mattwynne.net
http://www.songkick.com



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